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recovery shackle strap weight gmc4x4 stuck pulley winch cable synthetic

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#1 OFFLINE   Hedge

 
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Posted 27 September 2013 - 12:18 PM

When you purchase and use your recovery gear, how do you select which capacity to go with?  As we all know it's a balancing act between cost, capacity, vehicle weight, conditions, etc

 

For me I try to go with the highest capacity I can afford of quality brand items w/o going nuts.  My truck weighs 6500 pounds and I expect my weakest link to have at least twice that capacity.  I'm a big believer in paying attention to the week link b/c that will undoubtedly fail first.

 

However I do have steel chain that is rated nowhere near my 13k minimum benchmark.  I don't use it for vehicle recovery, but if pressed and there were no other options...it's what guys have been using on the trails since the beginning of time.

 

What about you guys?



#2 OFFLINE   BurbanAZ

 
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Posted 27 September 2013 - 05:59 PM

I pretty much go with the highest capacity i can find.  I do keep in mind what the capacity is though some stuff like my winch is rated high enough to screw up my frame pretty good if i started getting really stupid with it i think, especially if i used my winch which is 12k plus my snatch block then pulled full force at some weird angle or something.  I do have problems finding alot of stuff rated high enough though because i want everything rated over 12k because thats what my winch is, so i dont want to have a 8k shackle being at its limit if im pulling hard.


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#3 OFFLINE   AA1PR

 
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Posted 28 September 2013 - 07:47 AM

I too go large or go home

 

I opt for tow straps that are rated  at least twice my rigs weight, 2 tow straps, 2 5/8" shackles also

 

I have a loggers chain grade 120 for towing, but now learned its too big for my hi lift

 

the problem with 3/8 chain is that if you dont have grade 120 you are already behind the 8 ball


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#4 OFFLINE   Hedge

 
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Posted 21 November 2013 - 09:09 PM

I wish I had a picture of it, but at Rausch Creek we found a massive shackle in the dirt that must have been 1 - 1.5"  It looked the rigging for some massive crane.

 

It was strange bc it was missing the pin and the shackle was definitely worth a few $$....

 

I still need to pick up stronger sand ladders and I'd really like a HD manual winch option.



#5 OFFLINE   DMANbluesfreak

 
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Posted 20 December 2013 - 03:34 PM

I seriously recommend not using chain for any sort of truck-to-truck recovery, for the sake of your own health and wellbeing.  I've seen a window get destroyed as the broken chain wizzed into the back of the passenger seat of a truck that was trying to recover another.  Surely people have died or been seriously injured because of chains.

 

With that said, a properly sized chain is just fine for winching or using comealongs since you're not putting any impulse on it.  I agree that twice the vehicle weight will be sufficient for this type of recovery.  Any more is just a waste of money and weight.

 

For truck-to-truck recovery, I recommend a strap and some dead weight in the middle (in case a recovery point fails).  For this type of recovery, you could see up to 4-5x the vehicle's weight in the strap for a short period of time.  I've personally broken a 30k strap pulling someone out (granted, it was pretty old and beat up) and seen numerous 20k straps break.  I've jumped up to a 40k strap and haven't had any issues with it since.  For most of you a 30k strap will do very well and last a long time.  I'd probably have replaced the 30k strap I broke with another of the same size had I not gotten a killer deal on the 40k strap.  Another thing is to make sure the strap gets cleaned each time it's dropped in the mud.  The sand/silt can eat away at the nylon strands and weaken it.

 

For the dead weight, I use an old backpack with some gravel shoveled into it.  This would easily stop a d-ring from becoming a projectile if a recovery point failed.  If the strap simply breaks, there's not really an issue as it's mass is low enough that even if it hit someone in the head they'd probably remain conscious (though it'd sting pretty bad).  In a pinch, a gallon of water, another strap, a jacket/blanket tied in a knot, or any other somewhat heavy but loosely attached weight can be used as dead weight.

Of course, as with all recovery, if you're not inside the vehicle, remain a safe distance from the recovery operation.  Seen people get knocked over by wayward straps (a vehicle slides sideways and takes out someones legs) as well as numerous straps break and one time, a chain.  Thankfully none of these accidents have caused serious injury.

Be safe out there!


Edited by DMANbluesfreak, 20 December 2013 - 03:35 PM.


#6 OFFLINE   Hedge

 
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Posted 11 April 2014 - 09:59 PM

Great info DMan.

 

I agree with vehicle to vehicle recovery.  If something is going to break, that is where I've seen most failures. 

 

Vehicle to vehicle, I also only use straps.  If I had the extra $$ laying around, I'd love to try a dynamic rope.  Using chain is a dicey proposition especially with the low cost and availability of straps.  However, chains have been successfully used since we could form steel, but I'd agree 100% that straps are a safer option...and always put some form of a blanket over anything with tension in case of failure. 

 

I run synthetic cable on my winch and I still throw a towel on it even though it stores very little energy.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: recovery, shackle, strap, weight, gmc4x4, stuck, pulley, winch, cable, synthetic

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