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#1 OFFLINE   AA1PR

 
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Posted 11 August 2013 - 11:11 AM

I will start off by saying that I am looking for 3/8" chain to use with my hi lift as an improvised winching technique

 

hi lift recommends 3/8' by 25' or even 35'

 

I have some massive at least 1/2" if not larger logging chain I use for towing etc, but thats too big for this purpose

 

I have seen many different grades & seemed confused as to what grade I ought to get or should even use

 

but what I see doesnt look promising because 3/8ths  just barely looks strong enough to support a full sized rig

 

3/8" only seems to support 7100lbs & my rig is at least 6700 empty

http://www.peerlessc...oad-limits-wll/

 

& this site seems to suggest one would need grade 100     

http://www.1st-chain...om/WLLchart.htm

 

Here are a bunch of precautions we all should be aware of

http://www.peerlessc...tions-warnings/

 

what do you have & how has it worked for you, or what do you recommend, what do you do...


Edited by AA1PR, 11 August 2013 - 11:15 AM.

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#2 OFFLINE   bushcoat

 
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Posted 11 August 2013 - 01:20 PM

While I don't know much about the technical of chains, the ratings don't seem to ever include a straight line pull. I don't think you would need a chain to match the weight of your truck because you will never be lifting it straight up vertically. Depending what the towing situation is, for example if the truck is pretty much still rolling but just hung up, you aren't really pulling the weight of the vehicle are you? It dosent seem to me like you are actually pulling the full weight of the vehicle unless it is really stuck (like pulling with wheels locked). Resistance applied by means of sand, mud, etc adds to the actual pulling weight and I think a good example is the suction effect of a vehicle stuck in mud or clay. A  suctioned in mud 7000# truck will probably need 10 000# of force to actually move. This is all just a theory I have, but to me it seems to make sense. Essentially, people say to buy a winch double the weight of your truck which is supposed to compensate for this, but many times you hear of a guy needing 3 trucks to pull him out, or how a guy burned up a 12k winch with a snatch block on his 6k truck.

 

IMO, a trucker's chain of 5/16 variety will work fine. I have truckers chains from harbour freight that have lasted longer than any vehicle Ive ever owned. These chains get transferred from vehicle to vehicle in my tool box and Ive towed a lot with them, not to mention using them in ways chains aren't meant to be used. If you think its a tough situation, just double up the chain. These chains are a lower grade rating which are a lower strength chain that use a higher alloy content and are more likely to stretch than break. A higher grade chain is a stronger strength rating but more likely to snap than stretch. Think of it the same way as bolts are graded, a gr5 bolt will stretch before it breaks, but a gr8 will snap before it stretches. In towing a vehicle Id think a lower grade would be better. Also probably another thing to consider, Id guess that the rating on the jack is probably right around the same rating neighbourhood as the chain they recommend using it with and Id doubt that the jack's rating is more than 2.5 tons.


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#3 OFFLINE   AA1PR

 
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Posted 11 August 2013 - 01:27 PM

very well stated

 

the jack is rated for pulling at I think its 7000lbs

 

& most breaking weights for chains are around 24k lbs it seems so maybe you are onto something here

 

more decisions...

 

what I need is more $$$ for a new bumper & winch, that would make it easy


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1966 Stevens M416 trailer too ~ M416 Build thread

"Now she is gone I got my Yukon"   

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#4 OFFLINE   bushcoat

 
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Posted 11 August 2013 - 01:37 PM

More money always helps dosent it ?!?!?!

 

Im hoping to get my winch on next week... Hopefully... Cross fingers but don't hold breath lol


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#5 OFFLINE   BurbanAZ

 
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Posted 11 August 2013 - 11:03 PM

yea i think a bumper and winch is ur easiest option lol


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#6 OFFLINE   Hedge

 
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Posted 13 August 2013 - 08:10 AM

There's actually a chart someone made that identifies what percentage of weight you need to add to your truck based on how deep in the mud/water it is.

 

As an example, if you have a 5k lb truck and it's stuck in the mud up to the centerline of your hubs, add 10% weight...therefore you would need to pull 5.5k lbs.  If you're stuck in mud up the lower door frame, add 25% --- so it's 6.25k lb.

 

It's all general b/c some mud is much thicker then others, but it's good for a basic rule of thumb.  Has anyone else seen this chart and knows where it is?



#7 OFFLINE   DonYukon

 
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Posted 13 August 2013 - 09:25 AM

Ok Here comes the North Carolina Redneck Roots out of me here but Before I was aware of  Proper recovery techniques back in my youth, me and my friends always preferred a chain over any other strap , Reason? because After the first 1 1/2 of offloading I went through 3 straps and still had the same chain (to this day I might add)  Of course my chain is a little overkill It has never let me down , I still actually ride around with it for this reason , although I use straps and other techniques first I Always have that chain as a last resort . 


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#8 OFFLINE   bushcoat

 
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Posted 13 August 2013 - 01:18 PM

A chain is always helpful, especially to lengthen a strap that has some stretch or give to it. If you are going to be doing any extraction other than a direct pull (tight chain or winch cable etc), such as making any sort of ram or "taking a run at it", the energy from the vehicle has to go somewhere. A 5k truck taking a 10mph "run at it" likely produces the same energy as a 5k truck smashing into something at 10mph. Obviously the effect is not the same, but that energy is being absorbed elsewhere which isn't necessarily a good thing. When we see a part fail such as a bent hitch or a ripped or bent frame, axle, stretched chain, broken clevis or pin, etc we see how the energy is transferred. When we don't see damage, its usually there somewhere and will eventually show up in a cracked frame, cracked welds, stretched bolts or rivets, etc. Having something as simple as an old tire between two chains during an extraction will make a world of good for both vehicles. Snatch straps have the same effect, where they are using stored energy to make an extraction rather than jolting something out with so much force, the energy is absorbed and transferred through the strap.

 

 

I was just at princess auto, 16ft 3/8 grade 70 chain with hooks on each end $39.99 on sale.

 

http://www.princessa...Hooks/8259525.p


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#9 OFFLINE   bartonmd

 
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Posted 13 August 2013 - 02:49 PM

FWIW, transport chain or lifting chain (or anything used in lifting), like Grade 70, 3/8" transport chain is usually rated for 1/5 (or 1/4 of 1/10 or whatever the mfg. rates them at)  of breaking strength as a "working load limit." Also, that's on vertical lifts, so what that says is that you could lift your truck with it, with people standing under it, and drive down the road. It's plenty for winching.

 

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#10 OFFLINE   saltbranch

 
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Posted 01 November 2015 - 11:25 PM

Graded chain has to meet an industry design factor of 4:1. These ratings are set by and can be referred to by going to the NACM website. Grade 80,100 and 120 are all rated for overhead lifting and therefore meet higher standards and cost more. There is no requirement stating you have to have a grade 80,100,120 for pulling....ONLY for overhead lifting.The next 2 options are grade 43(3/8"  WLL:5400 LBS) and grade 70(3/8" WLL: 6,600 LBS).  You take the WLL: or Working Load Limit and multiply x 4, that equals the Minimum Break Load(MBL) that that chain should break at. It can break at a higher rating,, but should not break at a lower rating. One thing to be mindful of is that your chain is only strong as it weakest link. For example you have grade 70 chain, but put grade 43 hooks on it. Now effectively you have a grade 43 chain.  I use only domestic chain grade 70 or grade 100 for recovery and refuse to use the import. The only reason I use grade 100 is because I can get a good deal on it since I sell it. I would have absolutely no issues using strictly Grade 70 but I would prefer not to go to the lower grade 43 if I could help it. We have done countless destruction tests and can tell you the China stuff is not dependable. I know lots of people have great luck with HF china chain.

AA1PR  does this help to answer your questions?



#11 OFFLINE   AA1PR

 
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Posted 02 November 2015 - 06:52 AM

Graded chain has to meet an industry design factor of 4:1. These ratings are set by and can be referred to by going to the NACM website. Grade 80,100 and 120 are all rated for overhead lifting and therefore meet higher standards and cost more. There is no requirement stating you have to have a grade 80,100,120 for pulling....ONLY for overhead lifting.The next 2 options are grade 43(3/8"  WLL:5400 LBS) and grade 70(3/8" WLL: 6,600 LBS).  You take the WLL: or Working Load Limit and multiply x 4, that equals the Minimum Break Load(MBL) that that chain should break at. It can break at a higher rating,, but should not break at a lower rating. One thing to be mindful of is that your chain is only strong as it weakest link. For example you have grade 70 chain, but put grade 43 hooks on it. Now effectively you have a grade 43 chain.  I use only domestic chain grade 70 or grade 100 for recovery and refuse to use the import. The only reason I use grade 100 is because I can get a good deal on it since I sell it. I would have absolutely no issues using strictly Grade 70 but I would prefer not to go to the lower grade 43 if I could help it. We have done countless destruction tests and can tell you the China stuff is not dependable. I know lots of people have great luck with HF china chain.

AA1PR  does this help to answer your questions?

Ah thanks  so good to know

 

I carry a grade 100 loggers chain as back up


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2004 GMC Yukon, 4X4 SLT, 5.3L Vortec, ~ Yukon Build Thread
Trail Master 2.5" leveling keys, SkyJacker  Hydro 7000's & MOOG 81069 rear coils with 1.5" spacers,
Hella 700FF's,  Running on 33's BFG TA KO & XRC 12K Comp Winch

1966 Stevens M416 trailer too ~ M416 Build thread

"Now she is gone I got my Yukon"   

ExpeditionNorth.com






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